US Congresswoman Tlaib Blasted for ‘Dangerous’ Anti-Semitic Libel

“Pushing a narrative libelously accusing Israel of ethnic cleansing… is wrong and dangerous.”

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich. attending a Congressional committee meeting on Feb. 12, 2020. (AP/Alex Brandon)

Rep. Rashida Tlaib

By United With Israel Staff

American Jewish leaders sharply condemned a tweet by Rep. Rashida Tlaib (D-MI) which accused Israel of orchestrating “a decades-long ethnic cleansing project, funded by the U.S.”

Her tweet on Tuesday denounced the annual flag parade outside Jerusalem’s Old City.

Although the march was peaceful and did not pass through the Old City’s Arab Quarter, Tlaib referred to the event as “racist and violent ‘death to Arabs’ marches.” A small number of marchers who chanted “Death to the Arabs” were condemned by Israeli leaders.

Prior to and after the march, Gaza terrorists launched incendiary balloons, sparking a number of wildfires in Israeli areas near the Strip, though Tlaib had nothing to say about that.

Responding to Tlaib, Jonathan Greenblatt, director of the Anti-Defamation League tweeted, “We can and should have policy debates. But pushing a narrative libelously accusing Israel of ethnic cleansing or not seeing Palestinians as human – or focusing only on Israeli airstrikes without recognizing those are responses to attacks by terrorists – is wrong and dangerous.”

And in a statement to the Jewish Journal of Los Angeles, Stop Antisemitism Executive Director Liora Rez said, “It’s highly irresponsible of a sitting U.S. Congresswoman to blindly point the finger at our closest [Middle East] ally without mentioning the REASONING behind the bombing of Gaza – the two dozen terror balloons that set the south of Israel ablaze this entire week.”

Tlaib, born and raised in Detroit, is the first Palestinian-American elected to Congress. She supports the one-state solution and the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions campaign against Israel.

Due to their support of the BDS movement, Israel barred Tlaib and Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) from entering the country in 2019 shortly after their elections.

American Jewish leaders say tweets by the two Democrats stoke anti-Semitic tensions and create an environment that normalizes Jews-hatred.

A recent letter signed by more than 200 rabbis called on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to remove Omar from her positions on the House Foreign Affairs Committee over comments she made equating the Israeli and U.S. militaries with Hamas and the Taliban.

Lod’s imam arrested for incitement to terrorism

The sheikh also defended the violent Arab riots in the mixed city during the Hamas-IDF clash last month.

By Batya Jerenberg, World Israel News

Lod’s top Moslem cleric was arrested Thursday on suspicion of incitement to violence and terrorism following complaints to the police by right-wing MKs.

Sheikh Yousef Albaz had posted to Facebook Tuesday a video clip from a movie showing a villain murdering two police officers with the caption: “The best way to deal with injustice.”

Religious Zionist Party MKs Bezalel Smotrich and Itamar Ben-Gvir immediately asked the police to investigate, leading to the imam’s interrogation and detainment by the Lahav 433 serious crimes unit, Israel’s rough equivalent to the American FBI.

The sheikh, who regularly delivers sermons in Lod’s Grand Mosque, is connected to the Northern Branch of the Islamic Movement, which Israel outlawed in 2015 due to its close ties with Hamas and the Moslem Brotherhood.

This most recent post follows other inciting rhetoric he had put online during the Arab riots in the mixed city last month in support of Hamas, when the terrorist organization set off an 11-day clash with the IDF by firing thousands of rockets into Israel.

The Arab Desk of the Zionist watchdog group Im Tirtzu, which has been involved over the past several weeks in exposing the imam’s aggressive statements, responded to the arrest with satisfaction.

“This arrest was a long time coming,” the organization said in a statement. “Whoever repeatedly promotes violence against Israelis needs to pay the price, and we expect our law enforcement agencies to bring the full weight of the law down on this inciting sheikh and put him behind bars.”

In an interview with World Israel News last week in the aftermath of the violent clashes, Lod resident Ayelet-Chen Wadler specifically pointed to the cleric’s ongoing incitement.

“We still hear the [local] Imam Sheikh Albaz in the mosque calling for more violence against the Jews,” she said.

The imam had also publicly defended the Arab rioters as scenes of the violence spread over all Israeli media.

“The Arabs didn’t do anything, it is a direct result of the opacity and stupidity of the entire establishment, in addition to the police and those in the area,” Albaz told Radio 103FM at the time.

During the days-long attacks, one Jew was killed and several injured, a number of synagogues and homes were firebombed, and millions of shekels in damages were caused to Jewish-owned cars and other property.

Albaz’s lawyer, Khaled Azbarja, told Walla News that his client was innocent.

Albaz has been “harassed” and “persecuted” by the police, he said, “in the wake of unbridled incitement by the Israeli right that has incited for his arrest throughout the recent period.”

This is not the first time that the sheikh has been accused of incitement to violence. In 2015, Lod municipal council member Amichai Langfeld wrote in a Facebook post about an anti-Israel speech Albaz had given in his mosque.

“Defeat them. Tear them. Destroy them. Take them apart,” Langfeld quoted from the sermon.

The police intend to ask the courts Thursday to extend Albaz’s remand in custody.

More coalition headaches – this time from Meretz

MK Mossi Raz refuses to support “law that discriminates and imposes limitations on Arab citizens.”

Tags:Mossi RazMeretz Hezki Baruch , Jun 17 , 2021 1:19 PM Share
MK Mossi Raz

MK Mossi Raz Meir Elifur, TPS

Thursday brought more aggravation for the new coalition, with the expectation of failure to extend the law preventing family unifications between Arabs, where one spouse holds Israeli citizenship and the other resides in a Palestinian Authority-controlled area. The law is designed, among other things, to prevent Arabs from entering into fictitious marriages for the purpose of freely entering Israel.

The United Arab List, headed by MK Mansour Abbas who brought his party into the coalition led by Yair Lapid and Naftali Bennett, refuses to vote in favor of extending the law, depriving the coalition of four votes out of its total of 61 MKs. The Likud and Religious Zionism parties have also vowed to oppose the government on this issue, even though extending the law is usually supported by the entire right wing. And now another member of the government, MK Mossi Raz of the far-left Meretz party, has announced that he, too, will be opposing the law’s extension, “because it is a law that discriminates and imposes limitations on Arab citizens, a law that establishes whom he is permitted to love and whom not, and a law that views all Arab citizens as demographic and security threats.”

MK Miki Zohar (Likud) has already indicated that his party will only support the extension of the family reunification ban if the government also passes a law regulating Young Settlements. Zohar added that, “The new coalition is simply incapable of protecting the State of Israel and maintaining it as Jewish and democratic state.”

On Wednesday, Interior Minister Ayelet Shaked announced that she would be bringing the extension of the family reunification ban to a Knesset vote next Monday, even though it appears that the government will lack a majority to pass it. “I refuse to believe that the Opposition will damage the security of the State in the name of playing political games,” she wrote on Twitter. “I have no doubt that the head of the opposition will keep the promises he made as regards Israel’s security. There is no opposition and coalition in matters such as these – we’re all on the same page here.”

The coming challenge for the government – if it surmounts this one – will be to pass a state budget, which is to be a biannual budget for the years 2021 and 2022. According to the coalition agreements signed between Yesh Atid and Yamina, if the Knesset is dissolved due to failure to pass a budget, the date set for the rotation of the premiership is advanced.

Former US Pres. Donald Trump: American Jews don’t love Israel enough

“I did the Heights, I did Jerusalem, and I did Iran. I believe we got just 25% of the Jewish vote. It just doesn’t make sense.”

Tags:Donald Trump Arutz Sheva Staff , Jun 17 , 2021 7:42 AM Share
TrumpTrumpReuters

In an interview with Ami Magazine published this week, former US President Donald Trump expressed his disappointment with the response of American Jewry to policies he spearheaded as President, policies widely regarded as extremely beneficial to Israel.

“I did the Heights, I did Jerusalem, and I did Iran … I believe we got 25% of the Jewish vote, and it doesn’t make sense,” Trump said. “It just seems strange to me.”

Trump was referring to his administration’s decision to recognize Israeli sovereignty over the Golan Heights, long sought by successive Israeli governments; to the moving of the American embassy to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv; and to America’s withdrawal from the Iran nuclear deal that was seen as damaging to Israel’s security. These policies were hailed in Israel with Trump considered by many as the best President for Israel in decades. However, this did not, apparently, translate into votes in US ballot boxes.

Trump suggested, later in the same interview, that this was because, “Jewish people who live in the United States don’t love Israel enough.” “Does that make sense to you?,” he asked.

He also noted that, “I’m not talking about Orthodox Jews” – and indeed, the increasing support for the Republican Party among the US Orthodox population has long been noted. Among non-Orthodox and non-affiliated Jews, however, support for the Democratic Party remains strong.

Biblical King’s seal discovered in dump site

By Will Heilpern, for CNN Updated 11:45 AM EST, Fri December 4, 2015

The oval bulla -- which is 0.5 inches wide -- is estimated to be 2,700 years old.

Eilat Mazar, Photo: Ouria Tadmor The oval bulla — which is 0.5 inches wide — is estimated to be 2,700 years old.

Story highlights

A piece of clay inscribed with the 2,700-year-old seal of King Hezekiah found in Jerusalem

The seal was probably used by the King himself, according to experts CNN —  

A dump site is the last place you would expect to find an 8th century B.C. seal for a papyrus document signed by one of the kings of Judah.

Perhaps that’s why it has taken 2,700 years for the piece of clay inscribed with King Hezekiah’s seal to be discovered in Jerusalem.

It is believed to be the first-ever seal – also referred to as a “bulla” – from an Israeli or Judean King to be discovered by archaeologists.

“The seal of the king was so important. It could have been a matter of life or death, so it’s hard to believe that anyone else had the permission to use the seal,” Eilat Mazar, who directs excavations at the City of David’s summit, told CNN.

“Therefore, it’s very reasonable to assume we are talking about an impression made by the King himself, using his own ring.

“This the greatest single item I have ever found,” added Mazar – a third generation archaeologist.

The Ophel excavations were conducted at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount.

Andrew Shiva The Ophel excavations were conducted at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount.

The oval bulla – which is 0.5 inches wide – was discovered by a team from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Led by Mazar, the team were excavating an ancient dump near the Silwan neighborhood beside the wall that surrounds Jerusalem’s Old City.

The site itself, along with the nearby City of David, is contentious, because it is an Israeli archaeological dig in East Jerusalem next to a Palestinian neighborhood. Critics say the dig is politically motivated to extend Jewish claims over East Jerusalem and the Old City: archaeological finds become historical justifications

Watch a video about the Ophel excavations here.

The seal is believed to have been discarded from a royal building, with the rubbish.

The impression on the clay bears an inscription in ancient Hebrew script that translates as: “Belonging to Hezekiah [son of] Ahaz king of Judah.” Related Video Goliath gates discovered?

It features a two-winged sun, with wings turned downward, flanked by two ankh symbols symbolizing life.

Other bullas bearing the name of King Hezekiah have been seen on the antiquities market. However, the others are not as important because they were not found by archaeologists and therefore may not be genuine, according to Mazar.

What we know about King Hezekiah

“The bible describes King Hezekiah as one of the most important kings after King David,” said Mazar.

“He was rich, daring, stood up against Assyrians. A very impressive king,” she added.

King Hezekiah – who reigned from about 727 to 698 B.C. – is certainly portrayed favorably in the Bible. The Book of Kings II 18:5 says of Hezekiah: “… after him was none like him among all the kings of Judah, nor among them that were before him.”

It has been claimed that Hezekiah dedicated his reign to the reversal of the “idolatry” of his father. However, Hezekiah’s newly discovered private seal, which bears the name of his father, suggests that Hezekiah valued this link.

New clues in hunt for Nefertiti’s tomb

CNN’s Oren Liebermann contributed to this report. In an earlier version of this story, we incorrectly stated the location of the ancient dump. This has been corrected.

Rabbis urge Pelosi to remove Omar from House Foreign Affairs committee

More than 200 rabbis call on House Speaker to remove Minnesota Rep from House Foreign Affairs Committee following anti-Israel remarks.

Tags:Nancy PelosiRabbisIlhan Omar Elad Benari , Jun 17 , 2021 1:06 AM Share
Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarReuters

More than 200 rabbis are calling on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi to remove Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-MN) from the House Foreign Affairs Committee and are accusing Omar of inciting attacks on American Jews, Fox News reported on Wednesday.

“We reiterate that the mob attacks on American Jews today are directly attributable to the rhetoric of Rep. Omar and those who stand with her within and beyond Congress,” the rabbis wrote in a letter sent to Pelosi and quoted by Fox News. “To protect Jewish Americans and, moreover, safeguard the integrity of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, we thus insist upon the removal of Rep. Omar from her appointment.”

“Rep. Omar’s unfounded assertion that Israel committed ‘unthinkable atrocities’ by defending lives against an openly genocidal terror organization is not merely offensive, it is pernicious – for it is grounded in the blood libel and the calumny that Jews poisoned wells during the Black Death,” the rabbis wrote. “Without anything resembling a forceful response from the Democratic Party, tolerance of anti-Jewish hatred has proliferated.”

The rabbis said they had warned against putting Omar on the Foreign Affairs Committee in 2019 and accused her and her allies of “playing identity politics.”

“When 12 Jewish Democrats in the House rightfully denounced Rep. Omar’s abhorrent bigotry, the Congressional Progressive Caucus stooped to playing identity politics, cravenly claiming that the motivation for the condemnation was opposition to Rep. Omar as a ‘Black, Muslim woman’ rather than her anti-Semitic animus,” they wrote.

A total of 212 American rabbis and 12 rabbis from overseas, including Canada and Israel, signed the letter sent by the Coalition of Jewish Values and its president, Rabbi Pesach Lerner. The letter pointed out that the group has also condemned a Republican, Georgia Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene, for what they called “insensitive statements.”

Omar, who is notorious for past anti-Israel statements, caused an uproar last week when she equated Israel to Hamas and the Taliban.

In response, 12 of the 25 Jewish Democrats in the US House of Representatives published a statement said the grouping of the United States and Israel with the Taliban and Hamas in remarks about pursuing war crimes prosecutions gives “cover to terrorist groups” and called on Omar to clarify her earlier statements.

Omar then fired back at her Jewish colleagues and said, “It’s shameful for colleagues who call me when they need my support to now put out a statement asking for ‘clarification’ and not just call.”

“The Islamophobic tropes in this statement are offensive. The constant harassment & silencing from the signers of this letter is unbearable,” added Omar.

She later issued another clarification and claimed she had been misunderstood.

“On Monday, I asked Secretary of State Antony Blinken about ongoing International Criminal Court investigations,” Omar said. “To be clear: the conversation was about accountability for specific incidents regarding those ICC cases, not a moral comparison between Hamas and the Taliban and the US and Israel. I was in no way equating terrorist organizations with democratic countries with well-established judicial systems.”

Pelosi said Friday that Democratic leadership won’t take further action against Omar over the claims.

Pelosi was asked at a press conference on Friday if House leaders should take further action against Omar, who has a history of inflammatory remarks.

The speaker did not even let the reporter finish asking the question before answering in the negative.

“I think that she clarified her remarks and we accept that, and she has a point that she wanted to make and she has a right to make that point,” Pelosi said. “There’s some unease about how it was interpreted.”

Jewish Sovereignty

B”H
Yshai
Amichai :

Shalom.

I read your latest article [Citizenship Based on Torah: The Alternative] and say that I can’t agree with you more. The Zionist State is not the Jewish State.


While your article discussed the non-Jewish citizenship of Arabs in the modern state of Israel I think you might have been remiss in not discussing the concept of the Ger to-Shav (resident alien) as it relates to the December 1948 Jericho Conference wherein the Arabs of Eretz Yisrael voted by delegates for Abdullah I to be their sovereign and were thereafter “collectively naturalized” as citizens of trans-Jordan. (The fact that King Hussein de-naturalized the Arabs is of no consequence because international law classifies the Arabs (of the PLO and Hamas factions) as unprivileged enemy combatants due to the “Black September” 1970-1971 Jordanian Civil War… as well as the unchanged 1964 PLO Charter. See: https://johnmhummasti333455225.wordpress.com/2021/04/19/3938/ )

 
Since Jews never left Eretz Yisrael but rather have maintained a 3,000+ yrs continuous presence in the land, the jurisdiction of the Kingdom of Eretz Yisrael extends to all of M’dinat Eretz Yisrael. That is since Jews never left they possess sovereignty over all of Israel including over all of Judea and Shomron. Please read “Self-Determinism” –


https://johnmhummasti333455225.wordpress.com/2020/12/14/self-determinism/comment-page-1/#comment-2277

As such I’ve exercised my duty as a Jew and drafted and published a Constitution for the Kingdom of Eretz Yisrael:

https://johnmhummasti333455225.wordpress.com/2020/06/05/kingdom-of-eretz-yisrael-official-gazette-no-5/

Call me crazy, nuts, meshuggena, whatever. But in American jurisprudence, the law recognizes a class of one as well as personal sovereignty (sui generis) especially where such sovereignty is unclouded.


And then there is recognition given to the Holy See as a non-territorial state…. So I have done nothing unusual. Now if I were to make a claim that Rabbi Dayan should be king in Eretz Yisrael since he is a direct descendant of King David, that would be unusual.


Aboriginal or indigenous title is thus a sui generis concept.
Like the Native American or Canada’s First Nation, the Jewish people possesses a unique status as an indigenous body politic. Thus, Jewish sovereignty permeates Eretz Yisrael….
kol tov,
Yochanan Ezra
503-327-4268

The Pagan Origins of the Name of the Islamic deity

Pagan Origins of the Name “Allah

The word “Allah” comes from the compound Arabic word, al-ilah. Al is the definite article “the” and ilah is an Arabic word for “god”, i.e. the god. We see immediately that (a) this is not a proper name but a generic name rather like the Hebrew El (which as we have seen was used of any deity; and (b) that Allah is not a foreign word (as it would have been if it had been borrowed from the Hebrew Bible) but a purely Arabic one. It would also be wrong to compare “Allah” with the Hebrew or Greek for G-D (El and Theos, respectively), because “Allah” is purely an Arabic term used exclusively in reference to an Arabic deity.

The Encyclopedia of Religion says: “‘Allah’ is a pre-Islamic name … corresponding to the Baylonian Bel” (ed. James Hastings, Edinburgh, T. & T. Clark, 1908, I:326).

I know that Muslims will find this hard to believe so I am now going to make many citations and present the archaeological evidence to prove conclusively that is true. Though this data will be painful for many of our readers, it is necessary to face the truth. Facts are facts, and unless you are willing to desert all logic, reason and common sense, and the evidence of your eyes, they must be faced.

  • “Allah is found … in Arabic inscriptions prior to Islam” (Encyclopedia Britannica, I:643) 
  • “The Arabs, before the time of Mohammed, accepted and worshipped, after a fashion, a supreme god called allah” (Encyclopedia of Islam, eds. Houtsma, Arnold, Basset, Hartman; Leiden: E.J.Brill, 1913, I:302) 
  • “Allah was known to the pre-Islamic Arabs; he was one of the Meccan deities” (Encyclopedia of Islam, ed. Gibb, I:406) 
  • Ilah … appears in pre-Islamic poetry … By frequency of usage, al-ilah was contracted to allah, frequently attested to in pre-Islamic poetry” (Encyclopedia of Islam, eds. Lewis, Menage, Pellat, Schacht; Leiden: E.J.Brill, 1971, III:1093) 
  • “The name Allah goes back before Muhammed” (Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, “The Facts on File”, ed. Anthony Mercatante, New York, 1983, I:41) 
  • The origin of this (Allah) goes back to pre-Muslim times. Allah is not a common name meaning “G-D” (or a “god”), and the Muslim must use another word or form if he wishes to indicate any other than his own peculiar deity” (Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, ed. James Hastings, Edinburgh: T & T Clark, 1908, I:326)

Scholar Henry Preserved Smith of Harvard University stated:

  • “Allah was already known by name to the Arabs” (The Bible and Islam: or, the Influence of the Old and New Testament on the Religion of Mohammed, New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1897, p.102)

Dr. Kenneth Cragg, former editor of the prestigious scholarly journal Muslim World and an outstanding modern Western Islamic scholar, whose works were generally published by Oxford University, comments:

  • The name Allah is also evident in archaeological and literary remains of pre-Islamic Arabia” (The Call of the Minaret, New York: OUP, 1956, p.31)

Dr. W. Montgomery Watt, who was Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Edinburgh University and Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at College de France, georgetown University, and the University of Toronto, has done extensive work on the pre-Islamic concept of Allah. He concludes:

“In recent years I have become increasingly convinced that for an adequate understanding of the career of Muhammad and the origins of Islam great importance must be attached to the existence in Mecca of belief in Allah as a “high god”. In a sense this is a form of paganism, but it is so different from paganism as commonly understood that it dererves separate treatment” (Mohammad’s Mecca, p.vii. See also his article, “Belief in a High God in pre-Islamic Mecca”, Journal of Scientific Semitic Studies, vol.16, 1971, pp.35-40)Caesar Farah in his book on Islam concludes his discussion of the pre-Islamic meaning of Allah by saying:

“There is no reason, therefore, to accept the idea that Allah passed to the Muslims from the Christians and Jews” (Islam: Beliefs and Observations, New York: Barrons, 1987, p.28)According to Middle East scholar E.M.Wherry, whose translation of the Koran is still used today, in pre-Islamic times Allah-worship, as well as the worship of Baal, were both astral religions in that they involved the worship of the sun, the moon, and the stars (A Comprehensive Commentary on the Quran, Osnabrück: Otto Zeller Verlag, 1973, p.36).

“In ancient Arabia, the sun-god was viewed as a female goddess and the moon as the male god. As has been pointed out by many scholars as Alfred Guilluame, the moon god was called by various names, one of which was Allah (op.cit., Islam, p.7)

“The name Allah was used as the personal name of the moon god, in addition to the other titles that could be given to him.

“Allah, the moon god, was married to the sun goddess. Together they produced three goddesses who were called ‘the daughters of Allah’. These three goddesses were called Al-Lat, Al-Uzza, and Manat.

“The daughters of Allah, along with Allah and the sun goddess were viewed as “high” gods. That is, they were viewed as being at the top of the pantheon of Arabian deities” (Robert Morey, The Islamic Invasion, Eugene, Oregon, Harvest House Publishers, 1977, pp.50-51). The Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend records:

“Along with Allah, however, they worshipped a host of lesser gods and “daughters of Allah” (op.cit., I:61).It is a well known fact archaeologically speaking that the cresent moon was the symbol of worship of the moon god both in Arabia and throughout the Middle East in pre-Islamic times. Archaeologists have excavated numerous statues and hieroglyphic inscriptions in which a crescent moon was seated on the top of the head of the deity to symbolise the worship of the moon-god. Interestingly, whilst the moon was generally worshipped as a female deity in the Ancient Near East, the Arabs viewed it as a male deity.

In Mesopotamia the Sumerian god Nanna, named Sîn by the Akkadians, was worshipped in particular in Ur, where he was the chief god of the city, and also in the city of Harran in Syria, which had close religious links with Ur. The Ugaritic texts have shown that there a moon deity was worshipped under the name yrh. On the monuments the god is represented by the symbol of the crescent moon. At Hazor in Palestine a small Canaanite shrine of the late Bronze Age was discovered which contained a basalt stele depicting two hands lifted as if in prayer to a crescent moon, indicating that the shrine was dedicated to the moon god.

The worship of stellar deities, instead of HaShem, was always a temptation faced by the Israelites (Dt.4:19; Jer.7:18; Am.5:26; Ac.7:43). But HaShem is at the zennith of the heavens (Job 22:12).

“The Quraysh tribe into which Mohammad was born was particularly devoted to Allah, the moon god, and especially to Allah’s three daughters who were viewed as intercessors between the people and Allah.

“The worship of the three goddesses, Al-Lat, Al-Uzza, and Manat, played a significant rôle in the worship at the Kabah in Mecca. The first two daughters of Allah had names which were feminine forms of Allah.

“The literal Arabic name of Muhammad’s father was Abd-Allah. His uncle’s name was Obied-Allah. These names reveal the personal devotion that Muhammad’s pagan family had to the worship of Allah, the moon god” (op.cit., Morey, p.51).History proves conclusively that before Islam came into existence, the Sabbeans in Arabia worshipped the moon-god Allah who was married to the sun-goddess. We have also seen that it was a matter of common practice to use the name of the moon-god in personal names in Muhammad’s tribe. That Allah was a pagan deity in pre-Islamic times is incontestible. And so we must ask ourselves the question: why was Muhammad’s god named after a pagan deity in his own tribe?

It is an undeniable fact that an Allah idol was set up at the Kabah along with all the other idols of the time. The pagans prayed towards Mecca and the Kabah because that is where their gods were stationed. It made sense to them to face in the direction of their god and pray since that is where he was. Since the idol of their moon god, Allah, was at Mecca, they prayed towards Mecca.

As we have seen, and as is acknowledged amongst all scholars of Middle Eastern religious history, the worship of the moon-god extended far beyond Allah-worship in Arabia. The entire fertile crescent was involved in moon-worship. The data falls neatly in place and we are able therefore to understand, in part, the early success Islam had amongst Arab groups that had traditionally worshipped Allah, the moon-god. We can also understand that the use of the crescent moon as the symbol of Islam, and which appears on dozens of flags of Islamic nations in Asia and Africa, and surmounts minerets and mosque roofs, is a throwback to the days when Allah was worshipped as the moon-god in Mecca.

Netanyahu bloc petitions Supreme Court against Bennett-Lapid govt.

Likud, allies revive petition launched by Yesh Atid against changes to Basic law which allowed formation of previous Netanyahu-Gantz govt.

Tags:LikudSupreme Court Arutz Sheva Staff , Jun 15 , 2021 3:56 PM Share
Naftali Bennett and Benjamin Netanyahu,Naftali Bennett and Benjamin Netanyahu,Knesset spokesperson

The Likud and the member factions of the “Netanyahu Supporters’ Bloc” intend to file a petition with the Supreme Court against the amendment to the Basic Law: The Government that allows for the establishment of the “change government” of Naftali Bennett and Yair Lapid.

The exact same petition was submitted to the Supreme Court last year by the Yesh Atid and Telem parties against the government headed by Benny Gantz and Benjamin Netanyahu. This petition still exists and the Supreme Court is expected to rule on it next month.

In a discussion held last year on the sections concerning the alternative government in the Basic Law: The Government, the Likud movement claimed that the court has no right to criticize and invalidate basic laws.

At the time, Attorney Mordechai Ravillo argued on behalf of the Likud: “The sovereignty of the people must be recognized and the court removed from the political field. The position of the Likud and the Prime Minister is there is no room to overrule the Knesset’s Basic Laws. Even if it’s wrong. Even if it does not seem acceptable to have it in the law book.”

“Everyone is wrong, but who has the authority to repeal a Basic Law without any source of authority in the law? If we accept the petitioners’ arguments, we will lead the country to anarchy. Of course there are extreme cases, but then the public is expected to express its opinion,” he said.

Islam is a false religion

Islam is a false religion and we should not be legitimizing it by making it into a valid religion:

Muhammad got historical facts wrong and therefore could not be a prophet:

1) He claims Miriam, the sister of Moshe was the mother of Yeshki (Jesus);

2) he claims Haman of Megillat Esther was in the “court” of Pharaoh; confusing Nimrod & the building of the Tower of Bavel with Haman and Pharaoh;

3) and he claims that Pharaoh used the Roman method of crucifixion as a method for the death penalty;

4) and conflicting Islamic sources claim either Isaac or Ishmael was offered on the Altar by Avraham.

Muhammi had sex with Ashia when she was nine and still playing with her dolls. No, a Pedophile like Muhammad could not be a prophet.

Muhammi claimed Yeshki was a prophet “like all other prophets” but it can be demonstrated that Yeshki was a false prophet: Yeshki falsely prophesied the restoration of the Kingdom of David within the lifetime of his disciples. Matthew 16.28, Luke 9:27. That did not happen as Acts 1.6-7 demonstrates which makes Yeshki a false prophet.

The Torah (Shmoth – Exodus 23.13) states specifically “you shall not mention the names of other (false) gods.”

It should not come as a surprise that the word “Allah” was not something invented by Muhammad or revealed for the first time in the Quran.

The well-known Middle East scholar H.A.R. Gibb has pointed out that the reason that Muhammad never had to explain who Allah was in the Quran is that his listeners had already heard about Allah long before Muhammad was ever born (Mohammedanism: An Historical Survey, New York: Mentor Books, 1955, p.38).

Dr. Arthur Jeffery, one of the foremost Western Islamic scholars in modern times and professor of Islamic and Middle East Studies at Columbia University, notes:

“The name Allah, as the Quran itself is witness, was well known in pre-Islamic Arabia. Indeed, both it and its feminine form, Allat, are found not infrequently among the theophorous names in inscriptions from North Africa” (Islam: Muhammad, and His Religion, New York: The Liberal Arts Press, 1958, p. 85).

The word “Allah” comes from the compound Arabic word, al-ilah. Al is the definite article “the” and ilah is an Arabic word for “god.” It is not a foreign word. It is not even the Syriac word for God. It is pure Arabic. (There is an interesting discussion of the origins of Allah, in “Arabic Lexicographical Miscellanies” by J. Blau in the Journal of Semitic Studies, Vol. XVII, #2, 1972, pp. 173-190).

Neither is Allah a Hebrew or Greek word for God as found in the Bible. Allah is a purely Arabic term used in reference to an Arabian deity. Hastings’ Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics I:326, T & T Clark, states:

‘”Allah” is a proper name, applicable only to their [Arabs’] peculiar God. ‘

According to the Encyclopedia of Religion:

‘”Allah” is a pre-Islamic name . . . corresponding to the Babylonian Bel’ (Encyclopedia of Religion, I:117 Washington DC, Corpus Pub., 1979).

For those who find it hard to believe that Allah was a pagan name for a peculiar pagan Arabian deity in pre-Islamic times, the following quotations may be helpful:

“Allah is found . . . in Arabic inscriptions prior to Islam” (Encyclopedia Britannica, I:643).

“The Arabs, before the time of Mohammed, accepted and worshipped, after a fashion, a supreme god called Allah” (Encyclopedia off Islam, I:302, Leiden: E.J. Brill, 1913, Houtsma).

“Allah was known to the pre-Islamic . . . Arabs; he was one of the Meccan deities” (Encyclopedia off Islam, I:406, ed. Gibb).

“Ilah . . . appears in pre-Islamic poetry . . . By frequency of usage, al-ilah was contracted to Allah, frequently attested to in pre-Islamic poetry” (Encyclopedia off Islam, III:1093, 1971).

“The name Allah goes back before Muhammad” (Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, I:41, Anthony Mercatante, New York, The Facts on File, 1983).

“The origin of this (Allah) goes back to pre-Muslim times. Allah is not a common name meaning “God” (or a “god”), and the Muslim must use another word or form if he wishes to indicate any other than his own peculiar deity” (Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics, I:326, Hastings).

To the testimony of the above standard reference works, we add those of such scholars as Henry Preserved Smith of Harvard University who has stated:

“Allah was already known by name to the Arabs” (The Bible and Islam: or, The Influence of the Old and New Testament on the Religion of Mohammed, New York, Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1897, p. 102).

Dr. Kenneth Cragg, former editor of the prestigious scholarly journal Muslim World and an outstanding modern Western Islamic scholar, whose works are generally published by Oxford University, comments:

“The name Allah is also evident in archeological and literary remains of pre-Islamic Arabia” (The Call of the Minaret, New York: Oxford University Press, 1956, p. 31).

Dr. W. Montgomery Watt, who was Professor of Arabic and Islamic Studies at Edinburgh University and Visiting Professor of Islamic studies at College de France, Georgetown University, and the University of Toronto, has done extensive work on the pre-Islamic concept of Allah. He concludes:

“In recent years I have become increasingly convinced that for an adequate understanding of the career of Muhammad and the origins of Islam great importance must be attached to the existence in Mecca of belief in Allah as a “high god.” In a sense this is a form of paganism, but it is so different from paganism as commonly understood that it deserves separate treatment” (William Montgomery Watt, Muhammad’s Mecca, p. vii. Also see his article, “Belief in a High God in Pre-Islamic Mecca”, Journal of Semitic Studies, Vol. 16, 1971, pp. 35-40).

Caesar Farah in his book on Islam concludes his discussion of the pre-Islamic meaning of Allah by saying:

“There is no reason, therefore, to accept the idea that Allah passed to the Muslims from the Christians and Jews” (Islam: Beliefs and Observations, New York, Barrons, 1987, p. 28).

According to Middle East scholar E.M. Wherry, whose translation of the Quran is still used today, in pre-Islamic times Allah-worship, as well as the worship of Ba-al, were both astral religions in that they involved the worship of the sun, the moon, and the stars (A Comprehensive Commentary on the Quran, Osnabruck: Otto Zeller Verlag, 1973, p. 36).

Astral Religions

In Arabia, the sun god was viewed as a female goddess and the moon as the male god. As has been pointed out by many scholars such as Alfred Guilluame, the moon god was called by various names, one of which was Allah! (Islam, p. 7).

The name Allah was used as the personal name of the moon god, in addition to other titles that could be given to him.

Allah, the moon god, was married to the sun goddess. Together they produced three goddesses who were called “the daughters of Allah.” These three goddesses were called Al-Lat, Al-Uzza, and Manat.

The daughters of Allah, along with Allah and the sun goddess were viewed as “high” gods. That is, they were viewed as being at the top of the pantheon of Arabian deities.

“Along with Allah, however, they worshipped a host of lesser gods and “daughters of Al-lah” (Encyclopedia of World Mythology and Legend, I:61)”.

The Crescent Moon Symbol

The symbol of the worship of the moon god in Arabian culture and elsewhere throughout the Middle East was the crescent moon.

Archaeologists have dug up numerous statues and hieroglyphic inscriptions in which a crescent moon was seated on top of the head of the deity to symbolize the worship of the moon god. In the same fashion as the sun is pictured above the Egyptian deity.

While the moon was generally worshiped as a female deity in the Ancient Near East, the Arabs viewed it as a male deity.

The Gods of the Quraysh

The Quraysh tribe into which Muhammad was born was particularly devoted to Allah, the moon god, and especially to Allah’s three daughters who were viewed as intercessors between the people and Allah.

The worship of the three goddesses, Al-Lat, Al-Uzza, and Manat, played a significant role in the worship at the Kabah in Mecca. The first two daughters of Allah had names which were feminine forms of Allah.

The literal Arabic name of Muhammad’s father was Abd-Allah. His uncle’s name was Obied-Allah. These names reveal the personal devotion that Muhammad’s pagan family had to the worship of Allah, the moon god.

Praying Toward Mecca

An Allah idol was set up at the Kebah along with all the other idols. The pagans prayed toward Mecca and the Kabah because that is where their gods were stationed.

It only made sense to them to face in the direction of their god and then pray. Since the idol of their moon god, Allah, was at Mecca, they prayed toward Mecca.

The worship of the moon god extended far beyond the Allah-worship in Arabia. The entire fertile crescent was involved in the worship of the moon.

This, in part, explains the early success of Islam among Arab groups that traditionally had worshiped the moon god.

The use of the crescent moon as the symbol for Islam which is placed on the flags of Islamic nations and on the top of mosques and minarets is a throwback to the days when Allah was worshiped as the moon god in Mecca.

While this may come as a surprise to many who have wrongly assumed that Allah was simply another name for the God of the Bible, educated Muslims generally understand this point.

A Muslim Taxi Driver

During one trip to Washington D.C., I got involved in a conversation with a Muslim taxi driver from Iran.

When I asked him. “Where did Islam obtain its symbol of the crescent moon?” he responded that it was an ancient pagan symbol used throughout the Middle East and that adopting this symbol had helped Muslims to convert people throughout the Middle East.

When I pointed out that the word Allah itself was used by the moon-god cult in pre-Islamic Arabia, he agreed that this was the case.

I then pointed out that the religion and the Quran of Muhammad could be explained in terms of pre-Islamic culture, customs, and religious ideas. He agreed with this!

He went on to explain that he was a university-educated Muslim who, at this point in his life, was attempting to understand Islam from a scholarly viewpoint. As a result, he had lost his faith in Islam.

The significance of the pre-Islamic source of the name Allah cannot be over estimated.

Conclusion

In the field of comparative religions, it is understood that each of the major religions of mankind has its own peculiar concept of deity. In other words, all religions do not worship the same God, only under different names.